Abels & Annes

Fatal St. Charles Crash involved Driver on Heroin

1211143.jpg Do you trust other drivers on the road to act with your safety in mind? The prevalence of drunk driving accidents and impaired driving collisions in Chicago and the rest of Illinois suggest that you should not. Impaired drivers operated with limited faculties that make decision-making difficult and make them more likely to be the cause of an accident when they are behind the wheel. This explains why it is a crime in Illinois to drive while drunk and why these actions are treated so seriously by local police officials and state’s attorneys.

But the criminal fallout from a drunk driving accident or a drugged driving collision focus on the at-fault motorist; the victim or victims who may be injured in that accident are often left to their own devices to seek the help they deserve. In Chicago, victims can do so by bringing a civil claim for damages against an at-fault driver which may include a drunk or drugged driver. Relief may provide compensation for any damages that a victim incurred including medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, and future costs. These claims are complicated and the facts surrounding the accident can determine who may be held liable so it is a good idea for victims to speak with a personal injury lawyer to learn how the laws apply in their unique case. If your loved one was injured or killed, the right to seek relief may pass to you, and a lawyer can help you work through those scenarios as they may apply.

A fatal accident in St. Charles last month took a new turn when the suspected driver allegedly reported to police that he snorted a line of heroin shortly before driving, according to information obtained by the media. If that wasn’t enough, police statements indicate that the suspect also admitted to being distracted by his cell phone at the time of the collision and that he consumed marijuana and prescription drugs the night before the incident.

The crash occurred near Route 31 and Timbers Trail last month when the suspect allegedly drifted over a center line and collided with a second vehicle in a head-on crash. The driver of the second vehicle, a 65-year-old woman, died as a result of the injuries she sustained, leading the suspect to face criminal charges for his conduct. Reports have revealed that a urine test of the suspect detected marijuana in addition to amphetamines, barbiturates, cocaine, and prescription drugs in his system. A search of the suspect’s vehicle revealed a bag of a substance suspected to be heroin and some unidentified pills.

The suspect did not have a valid driver’s license at the time of last month’s accident due to a prior conviction of driving under the influence of alcohol
 

 

If convicted, the suspect could face a range of punishments from fines and fees to incarceration.

Victims of car accidents in Chicago and their family members deserve to have their interests protected and deserve to have an advocate on their side, fighting for their rights. That is what the personal injury lawyers at Abels & Annes, P.C. believe and that is what we put into practice every day. All of our lawyers represent only victims who have been hurt by the actions of others and we never represent insurance companies. If a collision has affected your life, we want to help you as well.

We offer a case consultation without any cost or obligation to those who call us toll free at (855) 529-2442 or locally at (312) 924-7575 and we keep a lawyer standing by 24 hours a day, seven days a week to take your call. We fight for the best possible outcome in every case we handle and we never charge our clients a fee unless we make a recovery for them. If you want to learn about your legal options or if you are looking for help, do not hesitate to call Abels & Annes, P.C. today.

Prior Blog Entry:

Cause of Fatal Chicago Car Accident Unknown, Chicago Car Accident Lawyers Blog, published December 4, 2014.

Resource:

Police say driver used heroin just before fatal St. Charles crash, by Erika Wurst, Chicago Tribune, published December 10, 2014.

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