Articles Posted in Motorcycle Accident

83152.jpgWhen a motorcycle accident happens in the Chicago area, public perception often places the blame on the biker without even knowing the details of the crash. But thinking like this is unfair to those who ride and often very misguided as a large number of bike crashes happen due to the actions of another person, whether that person drives a car, operates a truck, or is even on a bicycle.

The truth remains that it is legal for bikers to ride on the streets of Chicago and that they possess the same rights as all other drivers. Yet far too often, the rights of these bikers are ignored by others and motorcyclists find themselves in threatening situations that need not happen. If others simply acknowledged the rights of bikers, looked for motorcycles on the roads and at intersections, and yielded the right-of-way where appropriate, a significant number of crashes would be eliminated every year.
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519154.jpgSome areas of the country are suitable for riding a motorcycle year-round because temperate weather and a climate made for riding are present. Chicago, though, presents enough issues in the wintertime that most people in the city who choose to ride a motorcycle do so only in the spring, summer, and fall months. Once the snow and ice of winter begin to fall, the majority of Illinois motorcycles are put away and stored for the season.

This means that at present, many of the motorcycles of Chicago are out and running on the streets, expressways, and interstates of the city and of the surrounding areas as spring has finally arrived. With the reappearance of motorcycles comes a reminder to everyone that motorcycle safety is important and that it should be considered at all times while operating a vehicle. Mistakenly, many drivers who operate cars but not motorcycles believe that bike safety is not a concern for them since they do not ride; yet as anyone can be involved in a collision with a motorcycle, including those who only drive or ride in cars, trucks, or vans, safety should matter to everyone and all Chicago-area operators should attempt to prevent motorcycle accidents whenever possible.
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image-6.jpg Summertime riding in Chicago is a popular activity as motorcyclists take to the streets. Bike are a fuel efficient means of transit that many people enjoy; in fact, there are more than 240,000 registered motorcycles in Illinois alone.

Motorcycles are treated like any other vehicle under the rules of the law, allowing bikers to ride the streets as any other car would drive. Motorcycles are guaranteed the same protection as other vehicles and must abide by the same rules. Though they are authorized to ride, bikers often do not receive the respect they deserve, leading to dangerous situations were a collision might occur.

Motorcycle accidents in Chicago result in injuries and even deaths every year. When a crash is due to the negligence of a driver involved, whether it is another biker or the operator of a car, an injured motorcyclist may be entitled to financial relief under the law. These claims are the right of all injury victims to bring and are often available regardless of whether an at-fault driver received a citation in the collision. Further, in the event that a hit-and-run driver caused the accident, a victim may still be able to obtain relief through a claim against his or her own insurance company. Speaking with a personal injury lawyer who has experience representing motorcycle accident victims may help you understand your legal options and whether you have a valid claim.

A motorcycle accident occurred in Gresham on Tuesday, shortly before midnight, according to local authorities. The incident, which occurred in the area of the 7900 block of South Bishop Street, involved a car that reportedly failed to yield to the biker, causing a collision that left the biker with serious injuries including a broken arm and pelvis. The victim was transported from the scene by emergency medical personnel and taken to Advocate Christ Medical Center where he received treatment for his injuries. His current condition is not known.

The driver of the other vehicle received a traffic citation. It is not clear whether that driver was injured in the accident.
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094.jpg It is June and summer has finally arrived in Chicago. With the warm weather and mostly dry conditions, motorist in the city likely have noticed an increase in the number of motorcycles riding on the roads. Motorcycles are a popular means of transportation in Illinois and often are a cost-effective way to get from one location to another. In fact, in recent decades, the number of registered motorcycles in the state has increased significantly, further indicating what many see on a regular basis: motorcycles are becoming more and more popular in Chicago as time passes.

Motorcycles are legally authorized to ride in the streets and have all the same rights as other forms of transportation, like cars and trucks. Riders must obey the same rules of the road as others but bikers are afforded the same protections provided by the laws. This means that bikers are authorized to ride and that other motorists must respect the rights of bikers by operating in a safe and reasonable manner.

Too often, drivers fail to look for or notice motorcycles in an area, leading to a crash that often leaves a biker hurt. When this happens, the laws in Chicago may entitled the victims of these crashes to financial relief for their injuries, a claim that is separate and distinct from any charges brought by local or state officials. These claims are even available in many accidents where an at-fault driver does not receive a ticket for his or her negligent actions. Speaking with a lawyer who has experience representing the victims of motorcycle accidents may help you understand your legal options if you have been involved in a crash.

A Saturday morning accident in Bucktown left a motorcyclist injured, according to local police. At this time, officials believe that a 28-year-old motorcyclist was riding shortly after 1:00 am in the area of Western Avenue and Milwaukee Avenue when the biker was hit by an unidentified car. The driver of the car reportedly fled the scene of the crash without reporting the accident or even stopping to see if the biker was injured. Officials believe that a dark truck attempted to turn in front of the motorcycle but failed to do so when traffic was clear, leading to a crash that left the 28-year-old man injured.

Emergency medical crews responded to the crash and transported the man to Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center for treatment. His current condition remains unclear.

Authorities have not yet identified the driver of the truck believed to have been involved in the crash though their investigation continues at this time.
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image%20%286%29.jpeg A Wednesday morning motorcycle crash claimed the life of a 24-year-old Bartlett man, according to local authorities. The accident happened near the 600 block of West Lake Street in Bartlett shortly after 10:00 a.m. though it is not clear if any other vehicles were involved.

The driver survived the initial crash and was transported to St. Alexius Medical Center in Hoffman Estates for emergency medical treatment but unfortunately the man did not survive.

There are about 240,000 registered motorcycles in the state of Illinois which means a large number of Illinois residents own and likely use those motorcycles on a regular basis. With motorcycle use increasing in the state, drivers are likely to see more and more bikes on local roads and highways. With an increase in motorcycle ridership unfortunately has come an increase in motorcycle accidents, some of which result in serious injuries and others that end in death.

Nearly 4,000 motorcycle accidents occur in Illinois every year and the majority of those result in some type of injury. Unlike a car or other passenger vehicle, there is nothing surrounding the driver of a motorcycle meaning that a biker is likely to contact the ground, another car, or a fixed object directly with his or her body. The human body is not designed to sustain such impacts and as a result, injuries are common. Many bikers choose to wear protective gear, including leather and helmets, to reduce the chances of a fatal crash but a biker can only do so much. Whenever a motorcyclist rides the roads, their safety is in the hands of other drivers and one negligent act can lead to a catastrophe.

Distracted driving poses some of the greatest threats to motorcyclists on Illinois roads even though it is against Illinois to be distracted behind the wheel. The increasing prevalence of smart phones, tablets, in-car technology, and an increased pace of life leaves many drivers attempting to multitask while behind the wheel. While it might seem like no big deal to some drivers, sending a text message or checking an email is a common cause of car accidents across the nation and claims the lives of thousands every year.

After an accident involving a motorcycle, many drivers claim that they simply did not see the biker until it was too late. Yet this is never a valid excuse as every driver is charged with the duty to watch for traffic at all times, including motorcyclists. Anyone who causes an accident that results in injuries or even death may be financially liable for the damage they incur to the extent of and possibly in excess of any automobile insurance they carry.
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002.jpg A collision between a motorcycle and a semi truck on Saturday night left the motorcycle passenger dead and the driver injured, according to local police. The crash occurred near Tinley Park on I-80.

Authorities report that the semi truck was on I-80 traveling westbound as the motorcycle approached the highway. The driver of the motorcycle attempted to enter westbound I-80 and collided with the front right corner of the semi, causing the biker to lose control of his bike and then crashing to the ground.

It is not yet clear what caused the motorcyclist to strike the truck and whether the semi driver bears any fault for the collision. As a result of the crash, the female passenger on the bike was killed and the male driver was injured. The semi truck driver reportedly was unharmed in the crash.

Police have not yet stated if either driver has been charged in the crash or if there were any outside factors that played a role in the collision. The police are still investigating the incident which happened near Harlem Avenue.

Motorcycle riders place their safety at risk every time they get on a bike, whether driving or riding as a passenger. A biker can be as safe as possible while cruising the streets but a negligent driver of a car can still strike a biker, seriously injuring or even killing him. At times, a passenger on a motorcycle may face greater risk than a driver. Not only does the bike passenger have to worry about dangerous drivers of cars, trucks, and vans, but also about the potentially negligent conduct of the operator of the motorcycle.

The early facts in this case indicate that the operator of the bike in this case may be liable for the collision and therefore for the death of his passenger. If this is true, the biker may face traffic or even criminal charges stemming from the accident as well as the possibility of a wrongful death claim brought by the victim’s family.

A wrongful death claim is a civil action commenced in a court of law where the surviving family members of an accident victim seek a financial recovery. This recovery can be compensation for the lost time and interaction the family suffers as a result of the death, the losses a child faces from losing a parent, and even more concrete types of losses like the inability of the victim to support her family through wage earning.
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017.jpg A motorcyclist was killed on Monday morning while riding on the Dan Ryan expressway, according to the Illinois State Police Department. An accident took place between the motorcyclist and an automobile on the inbound side of the highway near 35th Street during the early morning rush hour.

The crash was in the northbound express lanes around 6:15 a.m. and was significant enough to shut all lanes of inbound traffic, which were later open by 8:30 a.m. The cause of the collision has not been released but police continue to investigate the accident, including whether either driver acted negligently.

Paramedics responded to the collision and transported the biker, who is reportedly a male in his 30s, to Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The man later died. Reportedly the driver of the other vehicle was not injured in the crash.

Motorcycles are involved in thousands of crashes every year. In 2011 alone, there were 3,756 motorcycles collisions in Illinois alone, causing thousands of injuries. Motorcycles are involved in a small number of crashes each year but these accidents are disproportionately responsible for a large number of injuries and deaths. There are many reasons for this, including the fact that motorcycles are smaller than most vehicles, making them more difficult to see. When other drivers are not careful or are not looking for a motorcycle, the driver can cause a collision with a biker who is lawfully riding.

Not only are motorcycles small but they also lack the protective compartment that passenger vehicles provide. Modern cars, trucks, and vans are designed to absorb an impact in areas free of occupants, like bumpers, while maintaining a rigid passenger compartment for the safety of those inside. In a motorcycle, there is no steel surrounding a rider meaning that the only thing between a biker’s body and the road is whatever safety equipment the biker chooses to wear. As a result, when a collision occurs, a biker is much more likely to be injured than a driver of a car.

Drivers are legally required to observe the rights of motorcyclists and to share the roads with bikers just as they do with all other vehicles. Yet not all drivers follow these rules and when negligence occurs, an accident is likely.
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560.jpgA motorcycle crash in Lakeview left a 31-year-old man dead on Thursday afternoon, adding to the already high number of recent Illinois motorcycle fatalities. The biker was reportedly on Inner Lake Shore Drive near the intersection with Grace Street on the north side of Chicago when he fell from his bike and was then struck by a car.

Officials have not specified the exact location of the crash other than that it occurred in the 3800 block near Grace, but it could be unclear since the intersection with Sheridan is mere feet to the north, which creates an elongated intersection in the area that serve three separate streets. The interchange can be confusing to drivers who are unfamiliar with the area and there have been crashes there in the past.

It is not yet known what caused the motorcyclist to fall off his bike or the car to hit the man and police have not yet said whether any drivers will be charged with crimes in this case.

Biking in Illinois is more popular than many realize. In fact, motorcycles account for about 4 percent of all registered vehicles in the state, meaning that one in 25 vehicles is a motorcycle. This number has been increasing steadily through the last 20 years as gas continues to climb and traffic jams continue to cause headaches in the city. Though they account for only 4 percent of all vehicles, motorcyclists made up 15.8 percent of all fatalities in Illinois in 2011. Part of the reasoning behind the disproportionate number of fatalities is that motorcyclists have very little to protect them if they are involved in a crash.

Illinois does not require motorcyclists to wear helmets when they ride and other safety gear, like leather jackets, gloves, and boots, is similarly not required. Without the protective steel surrounding them like they would have in a car and without a helmet, there is little to absorb the impact of a collision other than the biker’s body.

Even when a motorcyclist does everything right, he can still be a victim of an accident. Too often, cars fail to look out for bikers or drive in a manner that threatens the safety of a motorcyclist. This can lead to a collision which can leave a biker with serious or even fatal injuries.
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656046_red_bike-sxchu-username-ngould.jpgLast month, a 42-year-old Stone Park man was killed in a motorcycle collision on the Northwest side of Chicago. Chicago Police Department News Affairs Officer Amina Greer said the motorcycle driver was headed east on West Diversey Avenue when a sport utility vehicle (SUV) pulled out of a parking lot in front of him. The motorcyclist reportedly struck the side of the SUV prior to being thrown from his bike. According to police, a second vehicle also struck the man’s Harley Davidson and fled the scene of the crash. Following the accident, the 42-year-old man was transported to Loyola University Medical Center where he was pronounced dead.

The crash is currently under investigation by the police department’s Major Accident Investigation Unit. Greer stated the 28-year-old driver of the SUV was ticketed for failing to yield and driving without a valid operator’s license. It is unclear whether the man killed was wearing a helmet at the time of the fatal crash. Currently, there is no motorcycle rider helmet law in the State of Illinois.

In 2010, 4,013 motorcycle accidents were reported in Illinois. Although motorcycle crashes accounted for less than two percent of all motor vehicle accidents, they represented more than 14 percent of all Illinois traffic fatalities. Still, because riding a motorcycle is an economical means of travel, the number of registered motorcycles throughout our state has increased in recent years.

As this tragic case demonstrates, motorcycle riders are frequently catastrophically injured or killed when involved in a collision with another vehicle. Because motorcycles offer little protection, drivers may suffer traumatic head and spinal cord injuries, broken bones, paralysis, burn injuries, or even death. Despite that some believe motorcyclists are more likely to engage in speeding and other unsafe behavior, the majority of motorcycle accidents in Illinois are caused by another motorist’s negligence. Because Illinois is a comparative negligence accident state, a motorcyclist may still be able to recover compensation for any injuries sustained in a collision even if he or she was partially to blame. If you or a close family member were hurt in a Chicago motorcycle crash, you should contact a qualified attorney as soon as you are able.
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A Chicago motorcycle crash attorney at Abels & Annes has settled a case on behalf of a Skokie resident.

This claim stems from a car vs. motorcycle accident that occurred on July 2, 2010 in Northfield Township, Illinois. Our client was driving a motorcycle westbound on Euclid Avenue approximately .25 miles East of River Road. At that time the defendant, who was driving a 2008 Jeep grand Cherokee, rear-ended the plaintiff’s motorcycle. The biker was knocked off his bike and onto the pavement, landing on his left side and back. The negligent motorist fled the scene of the accident but was tracked down by witnesses a short time later.

Cook County Sheriff’s Deputies responded to the scene of the accident. The driver admitted to police that he rear-ended the plaintiff, and that he left the scene of the accident. The Sheriff’s Department ticketed the defendant with three separate counts of leaving the scene of an accident, and failure to reduce speed to avoid an accident.

On the date of the crash, the plaintiff was treated at Glenbrook Hospital due to road rash abrasions on his back. He was instructed to ice the affected areas over the next 48 hours, take pain medication as needed, and follow-up with a physician for further evaluation.

Shortly after the accident, the motorcyclist started to experience neck and back pain. On July 7, 2010 he followed up with a doctor’s office. He rated his back pain as 9/10, stating that the pain was constant and he was having difficulty sitting and difficulty at work. His neck pain was rated as 4-5/10. He was also experiencing significant pain in both his right and left big toes. He was diagnosed with cervical sprain, lumbosacral sprain with a possible bulging disc, and bilateral first digit toe injuries. At that time diagnostic tests were ordered, and he was to be reevaluated for physical therapy after test results.

On July 8, 2000 he underwent an MRI. The scan revealed no significant injuries. X-rays were negative for fractures.

The plaintiff then started a course of physical therapy consisted of electric stimulation, heat treatment, manual therapy, neuromuscular reeducation, mechanical traction, chiropractic manipulation, and therapeutic exercises. He attended physical therapy on 12 occasions that lasted through August 10, 2010.

On July 20, 2010 my client was examined by a medical doctor. The physician diagnosed our client with a lumbar disc injury, cervical and lumbar sprain/strain, big toe injury/contusion, and stress/anxiety due to the accident.

On August 10, 2010 he was again examined by the doctor. At that time the client was still having intermittent neck pain and low back pain that would increase with prolonged sitting, and decrease with rest and therapy. The doctor gave a diagnosis of lumbar sprain/strain that had improved, cervical sprain/strain that had improved, and bilateral toe injuries that had resolved. He was discharged from treatment at that time.

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